HYBRID EVENT: You can participate in person at Orlando, Florida, USA or Virtually from your home or work.

3rd Edition of Global Conference on

Addiction Medicine, Behavioral Health and Psychiatry

October 24-26, 2022 | Orlando, Florida, USA

ce-approved
GAB 2021

Examining Distress Tolerance and Residential Treatment Length of Stay among Heroin Users

Speaker at Addiction Medicine, Behavioral Health and Psychiatry 2021 - Orrin D Ware
Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, United States
Title : Examining Distress Tolerance and Residential Treatment Length of Stay among Heroin Users

Abstract:

Entering residential treatment for an opioid use disorder (OUD) can elicit a stress response. Further, entering treatment diminishes the ability to use substances to cope. An inability to tolerate stressors while in residential treatment may impact treatment retention. Distress tolerance is described as the perceived ability to withstand stressors. The more distress tolerance someone has, the greater their ability to withstand stressors. This study uses clinical chart data from 197 individuals with heroin as their primary substance admitted to residential treatment in Baltimore, Maryland, USA, between October 2019 through February 2020. The purpose of this study is to examine the relationship between demographic characteristics, substance use characteristics, the distress tolerance scale, and treatment retention. Demographic characteristics, substance use characteristics, and the distress tolerance scale are captured during treatment admission. The treatment retention outcome is captured after an individual is discharged from treatment. Bivariate analyses will be conducted to examine the level of association between key variables. A linear regression model will be used to predict the length of stay in treatment. A logistic regression model will be used to predict treatment completion versus premature discharge. The primary predictor for these analyses is the total distress tolerance score. Findings from this study may provide insight into the relationship between distress tolerance and treatment retention.

Biography:

Dr. Orrin Ware received an MPH from the University of Alabama at Birmingham and an MSW and Ph.D. from the University of Maryland. Dr. Ware is a practicing LCSW-C social worker in Maryland, where he provided direct services to people recovering from substance use disorders (SUD). He has worked in various research contexts and recently joined the Behavioral Pharmacology Research Unit at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. His primary areas of interest include treatment engagement and treatment retention for people with a SUD.

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